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Functional Family Therapy

Functional Family Therapy (FFT)  is a short-term evidence-based intervention proven to improve child-parent relationships, resolve behavioral issues, and strengthen family dynamics.

(To read our mask and COVID protocols for in-person visits, please click here.)

Wellroot therapists partner with the family to set goals which will be followed and reassessed throughout the treatment process. This treatment aims to engage each member of the family, and ensure that everyone feels heard and supported.

Together, families work through three defined phases of FFT treatment. These phases involve family engagement and building trust, learning methods to improve family relationships, assessing and changing negative behaviors, and then integrating these learned skills and resources into the family’s future.

Upon completion of the program, children and parents have acquired tools to address and resolve negative behaviors, and are prepared for continued stability and independence.

FFT Family Eligibility

Wellroot’s FFT program is available to families that meet the following criteria:

  • Have a child 11-18 years old in their home
  • Are struggling with child behavioral or family issues, including:
    • Risk of Out-of-home Placement
    • Verbal/Physical Aggression
    • Mental/Behavioral Health
    • Substance Abuse
    • Negative Peer Associations
    • Theft/Destruction of Property
    • Truancy/School Suspension
    • Family Conflict/Discord
    • Foster Care Disruption

How does FFT Work?

  • Once a family engages with Wellroot, they are matched with a therapist, who partners with the family to set goals for positive change.
  • The duration of treatment is based upon each family’s rate of progress but typically lasts 3-6 months.
  • Therapists provide psychoeducation so each family member can address acute problems, alleviate situations on their own, and strengthen family bonds.
  • Families complete the program when goals are met. If necessary, additional resources or referrals can be shared as the family nears the end of treatment.